Magazine Cover Design: Field & Stream

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​Field & Stream Issue: June Circ: 1.25 million Editor: Anthony Licata Design Director: Sean Johnston Publishing Company: Bonnier

​Field & Stream
Issue: June
Circ: 1.25 million
Editor: Anthony Licata
Design Director: Sean Johnston
Publishing Company: Bonnier

 

There aren’t a lot of magazines that feature “regular people” on their covers, but for Field & Stream, that’s business as usual. Still, for its June 2015 issue, the magazine skewed that concept younger—much younger. (MORE)

 

Grounded Architecture

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The cabin’s asymmetrical roof is covered in grey slate.

Zecc Architects, along with interior designer Roel van Norel, designed a compact “recreationhouse” in the Dutch province of Utrecht. The cabin’s clean, modern design creates a strong connection to the surrounding woods and features privacy shutters that change its look. Photography by Stijnstijl. All images courtesy of Zecc Architects.  (MORE)

The shutters are opened during the day, illuminating the space within with natural light.

The shutters are opened during the day, illuminating the interior with natural light.

The movable shutters can be shut during the evenings when privacy is required.

The movable shutters can be shut during the evenings when privacy is required.

One long room contains the bedroom, kitchen and dining area.

One long room contains the bedroom, kitchen and dining area.

 

The Fall of Saigon

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— AARP Magazine for iPad, April-May 2015

In 1965, the first U.S. combat troops arrived in Vietnam. Ten years later, Saigon fell. Today marks the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon (now Ho Chin Minh City) effectively marking the end of the Vietnam War. The Fall of Saigon was the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the People’s Army of Vietnam and the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (also known as the Viet Cong) on April 30, 1975. This event started the transition period leading to the formal reunification of Vietnam into a socialist republic, governed by the Communist Party of Vietnam.

The fall of the city was preceded by the evacuation of almost all the American civilian and military personnel in Saigon, along with tens of thousands of South Vietnamese civilians. The evacuation culminated in Operation Frequent Wind, the largest helicopter evacuation in history. In addition to the flight of refugees, the end of the war and institution of new rules by the communists contributed to a decline in the city’s population.

According to the National Archives and Records Administration, the number of U.S. military fatal casualties in the Vietnam War was 58,220 (as of April 29, 2008).

For a detailed view and timeline of The War That Changed Everything, tap here.

Abraham Lincoln ~ 1809 — 1865

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LINCOLN, 2013 by Wayne Brezinka. Collage, mixed media & acrylic on canvas / 48 x 60 in., 4 ft x 5 ft

LINCOLN, 2013 by Wayne Brezinka. Collage, mixed media & acrylic on canvas

 

Abraham Lincoln died at 7:22am, April 15, 1865, one-hundred fifty years ago today. This portrait of the 16th President of the United States by contemporary artist Wayne Brezinka is currently on loan at the historic Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., May 6, 2014 — May 6, 2015. Brezinka’s 4 ft x 5 ft portrait is part painting and part three-dimensional collage of cardboard, rope and several artifacts he collected from the 1860s.

Collage artist Wayne Brezinka spent two months gathering Civil War-era photos and newspapers to use in his mixed media Lincoln portrait. Image courtesy of Wayne Brezinka

Collage artist Wayne Brezinka spent two months gathering Civil War-era photos and newspapers to use in his mixed media Lincoln portrait. Image courtesy of Wayne Brezinka

 

Here’s a fascinating “video tour” of Wayne Brezinka’s “Lincoln”:

2015 Color of the Year: Marsala

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Pantone has declared Marsala, a naturally robust and earthy wine red, as the 2015 color of the year. Marsala, say the color experts, is rich, grounded, steady and satisfying, ideal for print, P.O.P. and packaging. (MORE)

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“Marsala is a subtly seductive shade, one that draws us in to its embracing warmth.” — Leatrice Eiseman Executive Director, Pantone Color Institute®

The Evolving Sonos Identity

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In 2011, consumer electronics company Sonos, known for their smart system of HiFi wireless speakers and audio components, retained Bruce Mau Design (BMD) to help re-think their brand identity.

Now, in 2015, Sonos continues to grow exponentially and numerous competitors have entered the market as wireless audio becomes more commonplace. Last year, BMD and Sonos pushed harder to signal Sonos’ leadership, relevance, and dedication to the music experience.

This new iteration of the Sonos visual identity advances the idea of the modern music experience into a rich diversity of expressions. The new identity launched internally with a BMD-designed brand video and is now making its way to the public.

An unintended benefit of BMD’s new logo design for Sonos is a visual effect evoking a sound vibration that appears on screens when the graphic is scrolled. Laura Stein, creative director on the Sonos rebranding, told Fast Company that there wasn’t a whole lot of science behind it, and it was a kind of “happy accident” that the logo vibrates and that this complements the original intention. (MORE)

BMD's Sonos logo has an unexpected result — scroll up or down on this page and you'll see.

BMD’s new logo design for Sonos came with an unplanned benefit — an optical illusion evoking a sound vibration that appears on screens when the graphic is scrolled. Try it!

God Only Knows

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The BBC assembled a “We Are the World”– style cast of globally famous musicians to sing the Beach Boys’ “God Only Knows” with its 80-piece BBC Concert Orchestra for a spot promoting the network’s newly launched BBC Music venture.

The network has dubbed the ensemble — which sings in a classically fantastical array of settings, from a jungle-scape on a stage to a hot air balloon — the “Impossible Orchestra.”

Pharrell Williams, Elton John, Lorde, Chris Martin, Brian Wilson, Florence Welch, Stevie Wonder, Brian May, One Direction, Chrissie Hynde, Baaba Maal, Dave Grohl and Sam Smith are among the dozens of performers who comprise the ensemble.

“All of the artists did such a beautiful job, I can’t thank them enough,” Brian Wilson told The Guardian. “I’m just honored that ‘God Only Knows’ was chosen. ‘God Only Knows’ is a very special song. An extremely spiritual song and one of the best I’ve ever written.”

The BBC has created a charity single of the song to raise money for its BBC Children in Need campaign. A physical copy of the CD is available for purchase in the U.K. and on Amazon, and it’s also available for download and streaming.

See the original story at RollingStone.com.

Oh, Say Can You See?

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Only about a dozen copies of the original 1814 sheet music imprint of Francis Scott Key’s “The Star-Spangled Banner” have survived. The original edition can be easily identified by the misprint “A Pariotic Song” in its subtitle. Courtesy of the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Only about a dozen copies of the original 1814 sheet music imprint of Francis Scott Key’s “The Star-Spangled Banner” have survived. The original edition can be easily identified by the misprint “A Pariotic Song” in its subtitle. Courtesy of the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Today marks the 200th anniversary of our national anthem. On September 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner” after witnessing the massive overnight British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812. Key, an American lawyer, watched the siege while under detainment on a British ship and penned the famous words after observing with awe that Fort McHenry’s flag survived the 1,800-bomb assault.

After circulating as a handbill, the patriotic lyrics were published in a Baltimore newspaper on September 20, 1814. Key’s words were later set to the tune of “To Anacreon in Heaven,” a popular English song. Throughout the 19th century, “The Star-Spangled Banner” was regarded as the national anthem by most branches of the U.S. armed forces and other groups, but it was not until 1916, and the signing of an executive order by President Woodrow Wilson, that it was formally designated as such. In March 1931, Congress passed an act confirming Wilson’s presidential order, and on March 3 President Hoover signed it into law.

In Memoriam: Lauren Bacall

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LAUREN BACALL, included in the National Portrait Gallery's "American Cool" exhibition.  Artist: Alfred Eisenstaedt 1949 (printed 2013) Pigmented ink jet print Sheet: 48.3 × 33cm (19 × 13") Image: 40.3 × 27.9cm (15 7/8 × 11")

LAUREN BACALL, included in the National Portrait Gallery’s “American Cool” exhibition, through September 7, 2014. Artist: Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1949 (printed 2013). Pigmented ink jet print.

Born: September 16, 1924, The Bronx, New York City, NY

Died: August 12, 2014, New York, NY

Lauren Bacall was definitely cool.

Each generation has certain individuals who bring innovation and style to a field of endeavor while projecting a certain charismatic self-possession. Lauren Bacall is one of the figures selected for the National Portrait Gallery‘s “American Cool” exhibition.

Ms. Bacall was 89 and a longtime resident of Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Launched by a Harper’s Bazaar cover when she was a 19-year-old model, the former Betty Joan Perske, born to Jewish immigrants in New York City, was signed by Warner Bros. in 1943.

Whatever she may have lacked in acting experience, the willowy teen made up for with a certain grace that was made camera-ready by the great director Howard Hawks. Lauren Bacall, as she had been renamed, modeled her character in 1944’s adaptation of a Hemingway novel, To Have and Have Not, after Hawks’s stylish wife, Nancy “Slim” Keith, and delivered the immortal line to the grizzled Humphrey Bogart, who was 25 years her senior: “You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow.”

A star was born. So was a legendary off-screen romance with and marriage to Humphrey Bogart, with whom she made four films.

Other memorable roles that made Ms. Bacall a Hollywood legend were The Big Sleep (1946), Key Largo (1948), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) and The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996).

Once Bacall left Hollywood for New York in the late ’50s, she found a new career working on Broadway, where, despite her raspy singing voice, she won Tony Awards for the musicals Applause (1970) and Woman of the Year (1981). 

In my opinion, she was one of the most beautiful and talented actresses in Hollywood. She had ‘The Look’ — cool and mysterious — and she had the sound, courtesy of that irresistibly low and throaty voice.

Thanks for the memories, Lauren.

 

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